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India Waste To Enegry

India Waste To Enegry

Postby energy unleash » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:47 pm

Every year there is an estimated 30 million tonnes of solid waste and 4,400 million cubic meters of liquid waste generated the urban areas of India. The municipal solid waste (MSW) generation ranges from 0.25 to 0.66 kg/person/day with an average of 0.45 kg/person/day.
http://www.eai.in/ref/ae/wte/wte.html

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Re: India Waste To Enegry

Postby cacofonix » Sun Sep 19, 2010 8:04 am

Waste to energy is one of the most interesting alternative energy areas in India. One, cities are finding it increasingly difficult to find space for their soaring landfills. Two, cities need more energy from alternative sources and waste is really a low hanging option in this context.

However, not everything is as hunky dory as it seems. Segregation of waste, logistics and the optimal technology for energy production are still critical challenges

Narasimhan Santhanam - Renewable Energy Resources for India
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Re: India Waste To Enegry

Postby DR Johansen » Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:50 am

I've been hearing about a new process (maybe not new?) for converting bio-mass to "bio-coal" efficiently.

wikipedia wrote:Hydrothermal carbonization:
HTC is a new variation (biomass conversion) of an old field (biofuel) that has recently been further developed by workers in Germany.[1] It involves moderate temperatures and pressures over an aqueous solution of biomass in a dilute acid for several hours. The resulting matter reportedly captures 100% of the carbon in a "biocoal" powder that could provide feedsource for soil amendment (similar to biochar) and further studies in economic nanomaterial production.

1.^ Maria-Magdalena Titirici, Arne Thomas and Markus Antonietti, New J. Chem., 2007, 31, 787-789. "Back in the black: hydrothermal carbonization of plant material as an efficient chemical process to treat the CO2 problem?"
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