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Solazyme and Bunge Form Joint Venture in Brazil

Solazyme and Bunge Form Joint Venture in Brazil

April 3, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com



South San Francisco-based Solazyme and Bunge Global Innovation LLC , a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bunge Limited, a global agribusiness and food company, announced today that they and other Bunge subsidiaries have signed definitive agreements forming a Joint Venture (JV) to build, own and operate a commercial-scale renewable tailored oils production facility adjacent to Bunge’s Moema sugarcane mill in Brazil. The JV, which will operate under the name Solazyme Bunge Produtos Renováveis Ltda., will have an expected annual production capacity of 100,000 metric tons of oil. The facility will utilize Solazyme’s renewable tailored oil production technology, coupled with Bunge’s sugarcane supply and processing capabilities, to produce sustainable tailored triglyceride oils for use in oleochemical and fuel applications in the Brazilian domestic market. Financial terms of the agreements were not disclosed.


“Bunge is excited to partner with Solazyme to commercialize its innovative sugar-to-oil technology platform, which will enable us to link our sugar and vegetable oil value chains,” said Ben Pearcy, Managing Director, Sugar & Bioenergy, and Chief Development Officer, Bunge Limited. “The tailored oils we expect to produce will not only expand our portfolio and address the growing demand of the fuels and oleochemicals industries, but also increase our capabilities to leverage new technologies for future opportunities in sugar and bioenergy.”


“The JV’s commercial-scale production facility in Brazil will provide Solazyme with the capacity we need to produce renewable tailored oils to meet the strong demand we’re seeing in our initial target markets,” said Jonathan Wolfson, CEO, Solazyme. “As a leader in oilseed processing and sugarcane milling, Bunge brings crucial expertise and scale to the table. Their global presence in sugar and vegetable oil markets, large-scale processing experience and significant footprint in Brazil, coupled with our advanced fermentation technology, creates a powerful alliance in the rapidly emerging area of tailored oils.”


The facility, which will be equally financed by Solazyme and Bunge, has been designed to integrate with a new cogeneration unit at the Moema mill, and can be expanded for further production in line with market demand. Startup is expected in the second half of 2013.


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Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

 
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Algae to biofuels technology company Algae.Tec Ltd. has announced its American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) is now trading on the highest tier of the OT...


 
University of Delaware researchers are studying whether the algal species Heterosigma akashiwo can neutralize harmful smokestack emissions – and also ...


 
OriginOil has announced the release of the Model 4 Algae Appliance™, an entry-level, low-cost algae harvester providing a low energy, chemical-free, c...


 

 


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Thu April 05 2012 03:40:14 AM by Tomcatino 1

GeneArt? Precision TALs

GeneArt® Precision TALs

March 21, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com


TALE proteins offer precise gene editing capabilities.

TALE proteins offer precise gene editing capabilities.



Life Technologies has announced the launch of GeneArt® Precision TALs, generally referred to as TAL effector proteins (TALE), which will allow researchers in healthcare, agriculture and energy the ability to edit genomes and control gene activity with unprecedented precision and reliability.


Specific applications range from design of disease and drug efficacy models for the pharmaceutical industry to human gene therapy, a field that has been plagued by safety concerns due to random insertion of introduced genes and vectors into the genome.


TAL effectors can be designed to bind to specific DNA sequences selected by researchers and can deliver a variety of functional elements to activate or repress gene expression or to cut and insert DNA with precision. TAL proteins have an advantage over competing zinc finger technology in that they are simpler to design and bind with greater specificity, displaying fewer “off-target” events.


TAL effectors were originally discovered in bacteria that infect plants, where they target specific DNA sequences in the plant genome, rewiring gene expression to establish and propagate infection. The simple TAL effector translation code allows researchers to specifically design TAL binding proteins to bind to a DNA sequence of choice.


“Researchers give us the sequence they want to target, and we send them a gene encoding the TAL protein that will target it,” said Nathan Wood, vice president of synthetic biology at Life Technologies.


GeneArt® Precision TALs are supplied as Gateway® compatible entry clones encoding a DNA binding protein for a specific customer-submitted sequence fused to a range of customer selected effector domains. Custom TALs will typically be delivered in 3 weeks after orders are placed.


The current offering includes TALs fused with gene activators, endonucleases or a vector with multiple cloning sites providing customers the ability to link their own functional domain proteins to the TAL protein, constituting a system that is easily customized to each researcher’s needs. A TAL offering with a gene repression domain will be released at a future date.


All products referenced are for research use only, and not intended for diagnostic uses. For more information, please visit www.lifetechnologies.com/TAL


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Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.
Thu March 22 2012 10:11:08 PM by Tomcatino 1

OriginOil Demonstrates Low-Energy Algae Appliance to National Algae Association

OriginOil Demonstrates Low-Energy Algae Appliance to National Algae Association
NAA workshop attendees view latest algae processing technologies (video, photos)
 
Los Angeles, CA February 7, 2012  – OriginOil, Inc. (OTC/BB: OOIL), a leading developer of next-generation technologies to produce transportation fuels, chemicals and foods, announced today it demonstrated its low-energy Algae Appliance™ to industry executives from a workshop hosted by the National Algae Association (NAA) at the University of Southern California.

OriginOil also showed new technologies in development in the lab, and the Max One mobile algae harvester. A video and a photo gallery of the event can be viewed at http://www.originoil.com/latest-news/national-algae-association-tours-originoil.html

“This is the first time in the USA that an industry group has seen our Algae Appliance, and we are very pleased with the feedback,” said Riggs Eckelberry, OriginOil CEO. “We showed an early version of the system last August to an industry group in Australia – and now we’re live in the USA!”

The Algae Appliance is a low-energy, chemical-free, continuous-flow ‘wet harvest’ system that can remove up to 90 percent of the water in which algae lives. Dewatering algae is considered a major barrier to commercial algae production. OriginOil released the system in October 2011 as an algae harvesting “starter kit” for producers the world over who are exiting the laboratory phase. For more information, visit www.algaeappliance.com.

“We are very pleased with the attendees’ interest and enthusiasm for our current and upcoming products,” said Ken Reynolds, OriginOil vice president of marketing. “We developed several potential sales and strategic partnership opportunities as a direct result of this event, and we plan to schedule more of these demonstrations of our breakthrough technologies to this fast-growing industry.”









 
Tue February 07 2012 08:49:32 AM by Tomcatino

Algae compressed & fossilized into petroleum.

http://www.originoil.com/pdf/OriginOil_Algae_Production_and_Networking_Workshop_NAA


Algae – Its Strategic Use


 



  • Ancient History



  • Algae compressed & fossilized into petroleum.

     


     



  • Nature processed the whole biomass – did not separate the oils.


 



  • Today’s Strategy



  • Lipids and biomass are being separated.

     


     



  • But are they utilized most efficiently?

  • Algae success is dependent on that efficiency.

  • What is the most efficient modality?


 



  • Tomorrow’s Strategy



  • Use whole biomass to create most cost-effective products.

     


     



  • Use extracted oil for high-value products.

  • Strategy must encompass the full spectrum


  •  


     


     



  • Biofuels



  • Biochemicals Bionutrients

  • Food.

     




 

Sat February 04 2012 12:41:12 PM by Tomcatino 1

BioProcess Algae and GPRE Break Ground on Iowa Production Facility

BioProcess Algae and GPRE Break Ground on Iowa Production Facility

February 2, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com


BioProcess Algae LLC and Green Plains Renewable Energy, Inc. have announced that they will start construction of BioProcess Algae’s five-acre production facility next to the Green Plains’ ethanol plant in Shenandoah, Iowa. The project will be comprised of at-scale Grower Harvester™ bioreactors and a plant to further dewater and process the algae into finished product.


Their horizontal reactors have been successfully running outdoors since the fall of 2011 and this marks their next step in the project to commercialize algae focused on markets for animal feed, fuel, omega-3 products and high-value nutraceuticals.


“After a successful rollout of the horizontal reactors at full commercial scale, we are eager to move forward with this project producing meaningful quantities of dried wholesale algae for use in products now,” said Todd Becker, President and Chief Executive Officer of Green Plains. “This new phase will mark the successful transition to a larger footprint located adjacent to our Shenandoah, Iowa ethanol plant, which will provide the basic inputs the bioreactors need: carbon dioxide, warm water and heat.”


“We continue to work with potential strategic customers including major food, animal feed, energy and pharmaceutical companies around the world,” says Tim Burns, Chief Executive Officer of BioProcess Algae. “Often times, this is the first access they have had to larger quantities of wholesale algae. Our goal is to produce algae in a cost effective manner that can be used as the customer sees fit.”


BioProcess Algae Grower Harvester bioreactors located in Shenandoah, Iowa have been continually running since their Phase I launch in October, 2009.


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Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.
Fri February 03 2012 11:12:43 AM by Tomcatino 5

Algae Producer Aquaviridis and OriginOil Announce Joint Commercial Agreement

Algae Producer Aquaviridis and OriginOil Announce Joint Commercial Agreement
Development of dry-land aquaculture could transform desert farm economies of the American Southwest and Mexico
 
Mexicali Valley, Mexico and Los Angeles, CA February 3, 2012 – Algae producer Aquaviridis and
OriginOil, Inc. (OTC/BB: OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to extract oil from algae and an emerging leader in the global algae oil services industry, today announced that Aquaviridis has signed a commercial agreement with OriginOil to help develop the multi-phase algae production rollout at its Mexicali, Mexico site, a potential model for algae sites throughout the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) region, with a focus on desert areas of the American Southwest and Mexico.

OriginOil will provide its expertise to help develop growth and harvesting solutions and implement appropriate OriginOil technologies. The facility will also serve as a test bed for OriginOil innovations.

In announcing the agreement, Aquaviridis president Thomas Byrne stated, “After evaluating OriginOil’s portfolio, our technical team felt that OriginOil had some novel, scalable, and potentially game-changing technologies for algae harvesting and growth enhancement. We are excited about the opportunity to work closely with them as a partner during our research and planning stage. Having the right partners and technologies is critical, as our expectation is to have this facility in revenue this year.”

Aquaviridis is backed by private sector funding, with plans to immediately scale up from research and development to ten acres of pilot algae production by the middle of this year. Commercial scale production capacity is expected by the second quarter of 2013.  Aquaviridis selected the Mexicali Valley as a strategic location due to favorable growing conditions, strong local and governmental support, and available sources of carbon dioxide.

OriginOil’s vice president of marketing, Ken Reynolds added, “The Mexicali Valley is a great place to develop an algae industry, given its climate and access to industry research and resources throughout North America. With the U.S. as a neighboring market for high value exports, Mexico is in an excellent position to take the lead in areas such as research and production of algae for nutritional products, animal feed, and oil for biofuels, which would create long-term regional economic growth and job production.”
Fri February 03 2012 08:25:04 AM by Tomcatino

Cornell Researchers Explore Algae-based Animal Feed

Cornell Researchers Explore Algae-based Animal Feed

January 31, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com


Cornell University animal science professor Xingen Lei’s lab is testing marine algae as a new protein-rich source of feed to supplement and replace some of the corn and soybean meal mix traditionally given to food-producing animals.


Lei’s preliminary research found that dried defatted algae derived from biofuel production can replace up to one-third of soybean meal in diets for pigs and chickens. It is an attractive source, say the researchers, because it is high in protein—20-70 percent, compared with about 10 percent in corn and 40 percent in soy.


Lei and his team are now working to determine which algae are best, and the proper ratios of algae, soybean and corn. They are also discerning whether there are risks or additional health benefits for humans in resultant products, such as meat and eggs.


The samples are shipped to his lab from Hawaii, where algae is being cultivated on a few acres near the Kailua Kona Airport as part of a $15 million pilot project by Cellana and a multi-university consortium led by Cornell professors Chuck Greene, professor of earth and atmospheric sciences, and Jeff Tester, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.


by Stacey Shackford, staff writer at Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences


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Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.


Wed February 01 2012 06:27:53 PM by Tomcatino 5

Dream: Algae Landscape and Architecture Designs

Dream: Algae Landscape and Architecture Designs

January 29, by Robert Henrikson
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com


How will algae production be designed into future landscapes, buildings and communities? What will they look like and how will they work?


Algae Competition invited algae enthusiasts, architects, designers, visionaries, builders, students and teams to design integrated algae production into future landscapes, farms, coastlines, cities, buildings and eco-communities. Algae Landscape Design categories ranged from urban landscapes, integrated commercial farms, community micro farms, village farms, suburban landscapes, rooftop systems, parks and gardens, agricultural landscapes, greenhouse systems, new model communities, and sea and ocean landscapes.


Emerging Themes, Schemes and Dreams in Algae Landscape and Architecture Designs

Numerous entries incorporated algae biofuel production systems in landscapes and architectural designs, reflecting the visibility of algae as a third generation biofuel. Nevertheless, entries overall did not focus on mega scale centralized corporate energy farms in remote locations as much as human scale interactive algae systems within localized urban, rural and water landscapes. Some themes, schemes and dreams have emerged:


Part 4:



  • Regenerating the natural environment

  • Restoring and enhancing polluted landscapes

  • Redesigning urban master plans with algae production systems

  • Creating urban green water parks with algae production systems

  • Innovating the traditional seaweed and marine algae industry

  • Floating algae biofuel production farms along coastlines

  • Capturing and reusing CO2 emissions in transport networks


Algae Competition Entries for Algae Landscape Designs

Here are some of the algae landscape design entries, and stories about them. All the algae landscape design entries are exhibited at AlgaeCompetition.com.


Regenerating the natural environment
1130. The Wilderness Catalyst, Czech Republic. By the Collaborative Collective, M. Davidová et al. 1148. Shoreline Regeneration by Algae Cultivation in Cigu, Taiwan. By Yen Chang Huang.

The Wilderness Catalyst, Czech Republic. By the Collaborative Collective, M. Davidová et al. Shoreline Regeneration by Algae Cultivation in Cigu, Taiwan. By Yen Chang Huang.



The Wilderness Catalyst, Czech Republic. Intervention on extremely devastated landscapes (man-made deserts) cultivates and discharges species of cyanobacteria as a catalyst for natural wildlife. Due to its adaptive features, NASA proposed cyanobacteria as a basis for creating life on Mars and it’s used as soil conditioner and biofertilizer to improve sandy soil in Saudi Arabia. This project is proposed for the brown coal basins in Czech Republic. Cyanobacteria of the Nostoc species can survive these conditions, absorb soil toxicity, and serve as biomass for further succession. Within 150 years virgin forest evolves from the devastated mine.


Shoreline Regeneration by Algae Cultivation in Cigu, Taiwan. A Sinking Shore Story. Historically, Taijiang Inland Sea was surrounded by seven offshore sandbanks, home to thousands of fishing boats. Now lagoon and sandbanks are disappearing. Algae is the base of the coastal food chain and is needed to build a new shoreline ecosystem. The process is to collect fish farm emission water to grow algae to construct a basic eco-loop, using abandoned oyster shells to make an algae cultivating oyster reef, creating wetland to attract wild fish, crab and animals, planting mangrove and coastal plants to attract wild birds. A new shoreline ecosystem is building!


Restoring and enhancing polluted landscapes
1159. Algae Energy Exhibition Park, Jingzhou, Hubei, China. By Chen Jie & Gong Ying. 1150. Echoes of an Ecos: New Marshscape in Mumbai, India. By Anshu K. Choudhri.

Algae Energy Exhibition Park, Jingzhou, Hubei, China. By Chen Jie & Gong Ying. Echoes of an Ecos: New Marshscape in Mumbai, India. By Anshu K. Choudhri.



Algae Energy Exhibition Park, Jingzhou, Hubei, China. The site along the Hanjiang river was a coal-fired power plant, with coal ash covering 50% of the whole area, severely impacting air, land and water quality of the nearby communities. Treated CO2 from the industrial zone feeds the algae systems to produce energy for the park. The design of the algae park will provide the public a comfortable park and popularize alternative energy technology.


Echoes of an Ecos: A New Marshscape in Mumbai, India. From algae incubators to biofilters, a living machine: a hybrid algaescape in Mumbai’s marshes, a connecting tissue between the urban fabric and the ecological mesh of a marsh. “Ecology and urbanization pirouette around each other in an intellectual ballet”.


Redesigning urban master plans with algae production systems
(Infra) Structural Algae Ecology for Taipei, Taiwan. By Aleksandrina Rizova & Richard Beckett. Urban Algae Culture in Gangxiacun, Shenzhen China. By Kady, Wong Hoi Kei et al.

(Infra) Structural Algae Ecology for Taipei, Taiwan. By Aleksandrina Rizova & Richard Beckett. Urban Algae Culture in Gangxiacun, Shenzhen China. By Kady, Wong Hoi Kei et al.



[Infra] Structural Algae Ecology for Taipei, Taiwan. This strategy is focused on minimizing the amount of newly built impervious surface by suggesting a porous intertwined network of transport infrastructure. Rainwater will be harvested through the porous urban fabric and recycled for horizontal and vertical farming. Algal photo-bioreactor towers will collect CO2 from vehicles and buildings. Horizontal layers of hydroponics systems will provide food for the city. Grey water from the buildings’ mechanical services and rainwater will be circulated and used for both systems. The project presents a new cultural dimension of urban porosity—a three dimensional tapestry of spatial sequences.


Urban Algae Culture in Gangxiacun, Shenzhen China. The Urban River from Waste to Source. This is a proposed masterplan for an urban village of 20,000 people within the larger Shenzhen city of 14 million people. The proposal re-articulates the “urban river,” the historic landform of Shenzhen, as a decentralized waste water treatment network with sources of recycled water on a roofscape. This elevated urban river roofscape has modular algae units for waste treatment and fuel production, urban farming and community space. It provides an urban farming solution for this highly mobile under-privileged population and a new economic driver.


Creating urban green water parks with algae production systems
Carbon Dioxide Eliminating Floating Green Park, Hong Kong. By Adrian Yee Cheung Lo. 1177. Algal Urbanism: 50 Year Master Plan for Alameda Air Base. By Olga Kozachek, E. Avera, A. Galo.

Carbon Dioxide Eliminating Floating Green Park, Hong Kong. By Adrian Yee Cheung Lo. Algal Urbanism: 50 Year Master Plan for Alameda Air Base. By Olga Kozachek, E. Avera, A. Galo.



Carbon Dioxide Eliminating Floating Green Park, Hong Kong. Rule of Nature: Waste is Food. This sustainable system use algae to turn car exhaust (CO2) into power for the city. Three functional modules are the Algae Cell to turn CO2 to H2+O2, the Fuel Cell to convert gases to electricity, and the Storage Cell for the city power grid.


The site is a shore front expressway next to a dense urban residential development in Hong Kong. A CO2 collector system is integrated with noise barrier. Car exhaust CO2 is pumped to algae cell modules for hydrogen-producing marine algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen and oxygen, separated by permeable membrane, then fed into the fuel cell to convert hydrogen and oxygen into electricity, with water as by-product to irrigate vegetation on the module decks.


Algal Urbanism: 50-Year Master Plan for Alameda Air Base. Decommissioned since the 1970s, polluted and mostly abandoned, the redevelopment of this site on San Francisco Bay includes remediation of habitat and wetlands, infrastructure, tunnels and towers to sustain re-population and algae production for biofuel.


Innovating the traditional seaweed and marine algae industry
AlgÔ, or the Regeneration of the Baie de Morlaix by Seaweeds. By Isabelle Bardèche. Seaweed Ethanol Distilleries in Scotland. By Scott Abercrombie, University of Strathclyde.

AlgÔ, or the Regeneration of the Baie de Morlaix by Seaweeds. By Isabelle Bardèche. Seaweed Ethanol Distilleries in Scotland. By Scott Abercrombie, University of Strathclyde.



AlgÔ, or the Regeneration of the Baie de Morlaix by Seaweeds. The Baie de Morlaix, located in Brittany, is regarded as one of the last French estuaries not totally destroyed by human impact. It is famous for its goemoniers, 19th century seaweed collectors who went to sea to gather seaweed for medical purposes and natural fertilizers for agriculture. Nowadays goemoniers have all but disappeared and the seaweed population, which was one of the richest in the world thanks to the particular geography of the seabed and currents, is poor and damaged.


AlgÔ is a proposed floating seaweed farm, a fiber concrete structure with aerogel insulation and natural ventilation. Seaweed culture happens in two steps: first inside the building where it is incubated and second outside in fields, where different kinds of seaweed grow to bring more wildlife in the bay. AlgÔ will help clean the water, re-colonize the bay with wildlife and transform the local economy. It will be a lab, a seaweed exhibition and visitor center.


Seaweed Ethanol Distilleries in Scotland. Macro-Algae in the Micro Community. Utilizing Scotland’s natural resources to generate sustainable economies. To reverse the decline in the Scottish seaweed Industry, this project proposes to reestablish a thriving seaweed industry based on ethanol biorefineries. Differing scales of communities on the West Coast of Scotland (small on the Isle of Eigg, medium in Orkney, large in Campbeltown) would support the fuel demands of remote and rural communities and provide the socio-economic benefits generated by a new industry, generating fuel, fertilizer and bioplastics.


Floating algae biofuel farms along coastlines
Production Landscape for Warm Coastal Areas of the World. By Ho Wing Ho. Automated Bloom: Bio-Farming in the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana. By Greg Barton.

Production Landscape for Warm Coastal Areas of the World. By Ho Wing Ho. Automated Bloom: Bio-Farming in the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana. By Greg Barton.



Production Landscape for Warm Coastal Areas of the World. The offshore algae cell farm powers the city nearby and its by-products benefit onshore agriculture. In daytime, rings of floating hydrogen producing algae cells, growing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, produce electricity and are inflated by gases. At night, the gases inflate onshore greenhouses as heat for plants inside. The offshore algae farm is the energy generator for the larger development of the onshore farmland. As the energy demands onshore increase, the offshore algae cells will proliferate to increase the energy supply.


Automated Bloom: Bio-Farming in the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana. This self-replicating floating algae farm is composed of robotic bio-plastic photo-bioreactor tubes in hexagons. The PBR tubes’ algal processes run through an automated network controlled by fluidic switches and actuators—a modulated series of closed feedback loops. The project will oxygenate dead zones in the Gulf, utilizing the Mississippi River’s heavy loads of nitrogen and phosphorous and capturing CO2 emissions from processing plants in Texas and Louisiana.


Capturing and reusing CO2 emissions in transport networks
Asteriofuel Algae Fuel Stations in Urban Areas, Barcelona Spain. By Ignacio Montojo. Green Miles. I-40 near Knoxville, Tennessee. By Kathryn Hier.

Asteriofuel Algae Fuel Stations in Urban Areas, Barcelona Spain. By Ignacio Montojo. Green Miles. I-40 near Knoxville, Tennessee. By Kathryn Hier.



Asteriofuel Algae Fuel Stations in Urban Areas like Barcelona Spain. The AsterioFuel network of geodesic domes, replicating the pattern of diatoms, is designed for cities interested in absorbing CO2 emissions and producing renewable fuels. The domes absorb CO2, grow diatom algae (asterionella formosa) to provide energy to the vehicles and offer shade covering for pedestrians in public spaces. The most suitable road system to spread the AsterioFuel network in Barcelona are the two main lanes that embrace the city by the sea and the mountains called the “Rondas”.


Green Miles. I-40 near Knoxville, Tennessee. Green Miles uses the negative outputs of gasoline as catalysts for bio-fueled transportation, relying on coniferous trees and algae. The goals are threefold: to offset daily and accumulated atmospheric carbon emissions, to recharge aquifers with water not polluted from highway runoff, and to provide a source of biofuel for an emerging system. The project begins with planting thousands of trees in the unused, “in-between” spaces of the site and the installation of an algae bioreactor system onto the side of the existing interstate infrastructure.


Emerging Themes, Schemes and Dreams in Algae Landscape and Architecture Designs

Coming up Part 5:



  • Enhancing quality of life in urban zones in the developing world

  • Supporting recovering communities in the developing world

  • Designing living buildings with photosynthetic architecture

  • Retrofitting existing buildings with algae membranes

  • Fueling algae-based urban eco-communities

  • Showcasing algae parks for entertainment and recreation

  • Living algae centers for education and research


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Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.


Mon January 30 2012 10:24:16 AM by Tomcatino 2

New Harvesting Technique Developed at Scheffield

New Harvesting Technique Developed at Scheffield

January 27, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com


Sam Shead writes in The Engineer.co that the development of a harvesting technique from researchers at Sheffield University builds on previous research in which microbubbles were used to make algae blooms denser and consequently easier to harvest. However, removing the water so the algae could be harvested remained problematic.


Now, a team led by Mark Zimmerman in the Department of Chemical and Process Engineering at Sheffield University has found that they can separate the microalgae from the water using microbubbles created by a fluidic oscillator that switches flows rapidly from one outlet to another, resulting in pulsing flow.


The fluidic oscillating system developed by Zimmerman’s team uses up to 1,000 times less energy to produce the microbubbles than the more traditional dissolved air flotation process. “Our bubbles are made under laminar flow and we use practically no more energy than is required to make the interface of the bubble,” said Zimmerman. “The idea is to create a surface on the algae particles that is hydrophobic so the microbubbles are attracted to it.”


When the bubbles and the particles reach the surface, the added flocculant and the coaggulant keep the algae in a fixed layer. The blanket of algae can then be skimmed off the surface with something such as a belt skimmer, according to Zimmerman.


Read More


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Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.


Sun January 29 2012 02:31:34 AM by Tomcatino

Scarborough company working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industry


Local biofuels company gets welcome support from province
Scarborough company working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industry

 



Local biofuels company gets welcome support from province. Pond Biofuels CEO Steve Martin, left, displays oil created by algae to Scarborough Centre MPP and Minister of Economic Development and Innovation Brad Duguid and Scarborough-Guildwood MPP and Minister of Consumer Services Margarett Best at the company's east Scarborough location. Staff photo/DANIELLE MILLEY


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A Scarborough company working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industry received some welcome support from the province Thursday.


Minister of Economic Development and Innovation Brad Duguid paid a visit to Pond Biofuels Thursday, Jan. 19, morning for a tour and to announce an investment of $1.9 million.


"That's the least we can do ... This is 10 new jobs here in Scarborough, which is wonderful. That is today, this new technology has the potential to create hundreds of jobs," Duguid said.


Scarborough-Guildwood MPP Margarett Best was also on hand for the tour in her riding.


Pond Biofuels has been piloting a new, high-tech carbon dioxide absorption system at St. Marys Cement in southwestern Ontario. The new system will reduce GHG emissions (a major cause of climate change) by absorbing raw smokestack emissions to grow algae, which can be converted into biodiesel fuel and pellets that act as a renewable coal substitute.


Steven Martin, the company's CEO, said the government investment will be used to take the project to the next level at the St. Marys facility.


"We're going to increase the scale and output of the facility to that more closely aligned with a commercial facility," he said.


Company staff split their time between the office and lab in Scarborough, and the facility in St. Marys, so the investment directly creates local jobs. Duguid said the support aligns with the province's vision of making Ontario a hub for research and innovation.


"It's an incredible piece of innovation that has the potential to have ground breaking importance both on reducing pollution, and building a healthy future and economic opportunity," he said.


The company was founded by Martin and president Max Kolesnik four and a half years ago. Much of the research around producing energy from algae was done in the United States as part of the Aquatic Species Program, which was cancelled in the late 1990s.


Martin said the difference was they took the information and set to work right away using untreated smokestack gas to feed the algae, which has worked very well. The partnership with St. Marys made that possible.


"There was a critical confluences of events," Martin said. "We were lucky."


Martin Vroegh, the environmental manager, at St. Marys Cement was already trying to find a way to reduce the environmental impact of the company before he met with Pond so it was a natural fit.


"These guys said the magic words, 'we can get rid of your CO2 and it won't cost you anything'," he said.


The cement industry is one of the biggest GHG emitters. For every tonne of cement produced, three quarters of a ton of CO2 is released.


"When our second most manufactured product is deemed to be undesirable it starts to become an extremely problematic thing, not just from an environmental prospective, but also a triple bottom line perspective," Vroegh said.


The company not only turned over its St. Mary's plant for the pilot project, but it's also invested in Pond.


Pond has attached 1,000 feet of stainless steel pipe to the smokestack at St. Marys Cement that leads to the algae containment area where all of the CO2 used in production comes from the smokestack (the algae also consume the nitrous oxide and sulfur dioxide produced at the plant). Algae grows quickly and can consume almost twice its weight in carbon dioxide.


Not only does the technology allow for carbon to be captured, but the resulting algae biomass can be used for energy production in the form of biodiesel or a coal replacement.


The algae produced is 11 per cent oil, of which Pond's technology can extract 90 per cent. One full-scale project at St. Marys could create 250,000 tonnes of algae, which could produce 29 million litres of biodiesel fuel.


"We're on the cusp of producing the fuel," Martin said.


Pond anticipates progressing to a full-scale commercial facility at St. Marys by 2014; Martin said they're also in discussion with steel plants.


 



Tue January 24 2012 06:23:55 PM by Tomcatino 1