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Latest Researches on Botryococcus braunii 41

Botryococcus is a genus of green algae. Botryococcus braunii species has gained lots of interest among the scientific community and biofuel industries due to its ability to synthesize and accumulate huge amount of lipids. Many researches had demonstrated that the biodiesel produced using the oil extracted from these microalgae is identical to diesel fuel. I have summarized some of the latest algae biofuel researches using Botryococcus braunii.

Researchers at Tsukuba University, Japan, have studied the oil yield of algae using Botryococcus algae. They have found that Botryococcus can produce fuel that is almost identical to diesel. They have achieved a production target of 1,000 metric tons per hectare a year in a laboratory experiment. They have planned to reproduce that outcome at a 1.5 billion-yen ($16 million) open-air pilot project starting in September, 2010.

Korean researchers have done a project on "selection of microalgae for lipid production under high levels carbon dioxide" using Botryococcus braunii, Chlorella vulgaris, and Scenedesmus sp. The results of the project suggested that Scenedesmus sp. is appropriate for mitigating CO2, due to its high biomass productivity and C-fixation ability, whereas B. braunii is appropriate for producing biodiesel, due to its high lipid content and oleic acid proportion (nearly 55%).

University of Bologna, Italy, had proposed a new procedure to extract hydrocarbons from dried and water-suspended samples of the microalga Botryococcus braunii by using switchable-polarity solvents (SPS) based on 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) and an alcohol. The high affinity of the non-ionic form of DBU/alcohol SPS towards non-polar compounds was exploited to extract hydrocarbons from algae, while the ionic character of the DBU-alkyl carbonate form, obtained by the addition of CO2, was used to recover hydrocarbons from the SPS. DBU/alcohol exhibited the highest yields of extracted hydrocarbons from both freeze-dried and liquid algal samples (16% and 8.2% respectively against 7.8% and 5.6% with n-hexane).
Wed April 28 2010 03:43:48 AM by Mathumitha Botryococcus  |  Algae oil  |  Algae Research 7753 views

Comments - 6

  • Wasana wrote:
    Mon April 26 2010 10:13:59 AM

    Has Botryococcus braunii gained enormous interest in the scientific community only because of its high lipid content or any other factors such as feasibility of growth also influence its presence in the algae fuel industry?

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  • Hawkseye wrote:
    Mon April 26 2010 11:53:48 AM

    I have an interesting fact about Botryococcus braunii. Of the various methods for lipid recovery in Botryococcus braunii,the most effective method was disruption of the cells with a bead-beater followed by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v). This gave a lipid content of 28.6% of dry wt.

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  • Manohar wrote:
    Tue April 27 2010 04:44:44 AM

    Amazing ! It costs about Rs 68 a liter !
    Madhumitha ! It is great !
    --------------------------------------------
    " Researchers at Tsukuba University, Japan, have studied the oil yield of algae using Botryococcus algae. They have found out that Botryococcus can produce fuel that is almost identical to diesel. They have achieved a production target of 1,000 metric tons per hectare a year in a laboratory experiment. They planned to reproduce that outcome at a 1.5 billion-yen ($16 million) open-air pilot project starting in September, 2010. "

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  • Manohar wrote:
    Tue April 27 2010 04:47:02 AM

    We can do better in India with lower labour cost.

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  • Abomohra wrote:
    Mon May 03 2010 01:13:00 PM

    I asked my self, Is it possible to genetic engineered B. braunii and Scenedesmus sp. to get a mutant with high lipid production (advantage of B. braunii) and at the same time with high appropriate for mitigating CO2, due to its high biomass productivity and C-fixation (advantage of Scenedesmus)??

    I'm looking forward to hear your experiences.

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  • Poonam wrote:
    Wed May 05 2010 09:38:19 AM

    HI
    well one of the drawback of this algae is the lower rate of biomass production. Hence others like nanochloropsis and dunalliella have an edge over it

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