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Controls and sensors for a PBR

Are the requirments for sensors and controls for inputs basicaly the same for photo' and hetro' algae


reactors?  Can you site some companies that have control systems ready to apply to algae reactors?


Thanks for your input.


Alan

Tue May 24 2011 04:40:33 AM by SAMDevelopment 39

Congratulations to Bard for being one of the first to benchmark at NAA

Congratulations to Surajit Khanna and the rest of the crew for your successful efforts in bring a new commerical algae venture into existence.


Below is a copy of a news release by the NAA.


T









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Home of the Algaepreneur








 


The National Algae Association's Algae Commercialization, Research and Business Networking Forum on January 13-14, 2011, proved that commercial-scale algae production is just around the corner, according to NAA Executive Director Barry Cohen.  Attendees and presenters collaborated to further develop the knowledge, equipment and skills to take algae out of laboratories and into commercial-scale development.


 


"One of the key developments from the conference in Houston on January 14, 2011 was an announcement by BARD Holding Inc., a leading U.S. algae production company, that it is coming forward to have its commercial process fully benchmarked in accordance to the National Algae Association guidelines. BARD will be the first company to subject itself to three sets of independent validation and has agreed to share results with the industry. This will help validate algae oil content and commercial scale production claims with hard data." The executive director of the NAA, Barry Cohen, viewed a presentation of BARD's commercial-scale algae production system and shared his impressions to attendees at the conference, concluding with "...BARD's technologies are unique and promising and we anxiously await confirmation of the data by unrelated outside third-party labs."


 


Following the conference, Cohen addressed the Leadership Forum US in Washington, D.C.  and discussed the urgency of redirecting a portion of algae research funds towards the construction of commercial algae production farms so the US will be better poised to compete in the world market for algae biofuels and co-products. NAA members have started to build on acreage throughout the US and are looking for financing for full-scale commercial algae production facilities.   Most of the algae research hurdles have been addressed, and engineering and scale-up issues have been identified.  NAA believes that it and its members have resolved those issues and are ready to scale-up.  "New research and enhancements will go on in the background," according to Cohen,  "but we must scale-up the algae production industry in order to know if any of the existing technologies developed in universities can be scaled on hundreds of acres throughout the US".


 


For additional information contact:

National Algae Association
4747 Research Forest Drive, Suite 180
The Woodlands, TX 77381
936-321-1125
 info@nationalalgaeassociation.com 
 


 


The NAA does not engage in the practice of sending unsolicited emails.  To be removed please reply to this email with "unsubscribe" in the subject line. The information in this transmission may contain privileged and confidential information.

he National Algae Association's Algae Commercialization, Research and Business Networking Forum on January 13-14, 2011, proved that commercial-scale algae production is just around the corner, according to NAA Executive Director Barry Cohen.  Attendees and presenters collaborated to further develop the knowledge, equipment and skills to take algae out of laboratories and into commercial-scale development.


 


"One of the key developments from the conference in Houston on January 14, 2011 was an announcement by BARD Holding Inc., a leading U.S. algae production company, that it is coming forward to have its commercial process fully benchmarked in accordance to the National Algae Association guidelines. BARD will be the first company to subject itself to three sets of independent validation and has agreed to share results with the industry. This will help validate algae oil content and commercial scale production claims with hard data." The executive director of the NAA, Barry Cohen, viewed a presentation of BARD's commercial-scale algae production system and shared his impressions to attendees at the conference, concluding with "...BARD's technologies are unique and promising and we anxiously await confirmation of the data by unrelated outside third-party labs."


 


Following the conference, Cohen addressed the Leadership Forum US in Washington, D.C.  and discussed the urgency of redirecting a portion of algae research funds towards the construction of commercial algae production farms so the US will be better poised to compete in the world market for algae biofuels and co-products. NAA members have started to build on acreage throughout the US and are looking for financing for full-scale commercial algae production facilities.   Most of the algae research hurdles have been addressed, and engineering and scale-up issues have been identified.  NAA believes that it and its members have resolved those issues and are ready to scale-up.  "New research and enhancements will go on in the background," according to Cohen,  "but we must scale-up the algae production industry in order to know if any of the existing technologies developed in universities can be scaled on hundreds of acres throughout the US".


 


For additional information contact:

National Algae Association
4747 Research Forest Drive, Suite 180
The Woodlands, TX 77381
936-321-1125
 info@nationalalgaeassociation.com 
 


 


The NAA does not engage in the practice of sending unsolicited emails.  To be removed please reply to this email with "unsubscribe" in the subject line. The information in this transmission may contain privileged and confidential information

Thu January 27 2011 09:06:12 PM by SAMDevelopment 32

Final Showdown; modern bioreactor vs. open ditches, raceways,etc.

November 26 2010 03:00:15 PM


Hello FOA,


I will spend some time and see how far I get along the road looking for an answer for the question: Which is better a modern PBR system or an outdoor raceway or ditch system?


 Here are some figures put forth by several Universities and national Labs.   


Algae biofuel costing -


Energy Biosciences Institute  in partnership with BP, the University of California, Berkeley; the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and the University of Illinois have arrived at an estimate for algae biofuel production.

The estimated capital costs for a 250-acre biofuel production system emphasising oil production were about $21 million, with annual operating costs at around $1.5 million, to produce about 12,300 barrels of oil, giving a break-even price per barrel of oil of $330 (based on an 8 percent capital charge).
 


I think that many PHDs had a hand in putting this report together.  I am sure their math is correct. The point I might question is their annual operating cost.  I just wonder if they added in their depreciation cost.  If their construction cost is $ 21,000,000 for 250 acres of ditch or raceway or pond, we really don't know exactly what they are spending that money on, all we know is they are spreading this out over 250 acres.  Any plastic will have a limited life out in the sun.  I will be kind and give it a life of 12 years.  So lets say of the 21 million spent 18 million went into plastic ditch liners.  So, 18 divided by 12 years equals 1.5 million per year for depreciation cost.   Hmmmmm?


They claim that their system of 250 acres will produce 12,300 barrels of oil per year. 


An emitter of 25,000 scfm of CO2, will produce 912,500 barrels of oil per year if it is processed through 6 modern bioreactors  of 1,000,000 gallon capicity each and each one is processing 4,000 scfm of CO2,   24/7/365.    (that is being very liberal in allowing 2.8 lbs. of CO2 to produce 1 lb. of dry algae.  Most good bioreactors will produce 1 lb of algae with 2 lbs. of CO2 or even less CO2. 


6 reactors  times $3,000,000 each  = $18,000,000 For an enclosed system that works 24 hours every day.


912,500 barrels/year (our system)  divided by 12,300 barrels/year ( UCB et.al.) = 74.18 systems to equal enough productivity to convert 25,000 cfm of CO2 into 912,500 barrels of algae oil.


Now we get down to the 'nitty gritty'.  


FOOTPRINT:


acreage covered by the ditch system:  250 acres/system  X  74.18 systems (to equal 6 one million gallon bioreactors)  =  18,545 acres.


acreage covered by bioreactors 1 bioreactor covers .4166 acres X 6 reactors = 2.5 acres.


 


CONSTRUCTION COST:


Ditch system, their cost estimates.  Remember it will take 74.18 of their 'systems' to produce the tons of algae to "eat up" 25,000 cfm of CO2.  This is their figures. 


74.18 systems  X  $ 21,000,000 each = $ 1,557,780,000. to equal the output of our 6 bio-reactors.


6 bio-reactors X $3,000,000 each        = $ 18,000,000


 


                                               SUMMARY 


 Cost for 25,000 cfm                   cost                       land footprint


modern bioreactor                $18,000,000                  2.5 acres


outdoor ditch system       $1,557,780,000             18,545 acres


 


Now where is the problem?


Alan


 

Fri November 26 2010 03:38:43 PM by SAMDevelopment 57

Question for Blake on post Oct. 1 early a.m.


Blake where did you get the number of $150 per square meter for a cost for a modern PBR?


A square meter is not a good way to compare ditches with a PBR.  A more accurate way of comparsion would be to use gallon capicity and production per gallon per day.


If you compare a square meter of ditch surface to a square meter of PBR surface, yes, the PBR will cost more per meter of surface area.


Lets say the ditch has an effective production debth of  four inches and of coarse only works less than fifty percent of the time.  The modern PBR could be 40 feet deep and be lighted all the way from the top to the bottom.  And it will work 24 hours a day with flashing, color specific LEDs that are only on 10% of the time in micro bursts of photons.


Now take 40' X 3 = 120 square meters of reactor producing algae under perfectly controlled conditions.


Oh yes, did we forget that this operates 24/7/365.


So we gain another 12 hours per day on the ditch.


So now we are up to 240 effective square meters 4" deep and we are compareing that 1 meter of PBR surface to 1 meter of ditch surface.  Hardly seems fair.


 


 


 

Fri October 01 2010 10:13:48 PM by SAMDevelopment 28

Some numbers from the past. (blogs)

Let's continue with the math on a industrial algae
system that converts 25,000 scfm of CO2 into crude algae oil and dry algae meal.
BTW, what is going to happen to the very 'thin' market
of high priced speciality products when, let's say 50
of these systems come on line? Can you say ""POOOF""!

ANSWER TO QUESTION #3 OF "MONDAY MATH." POST 2
Question #3: What is the GROSS returns in dollars for the production of two algae products....oil and protien meal? We assume that the algae production will be equally divided; 50% oil and 50% meal.

Here are some additional assumptions: oil sells for $80.00 per barrel, algae meal sells for $300.00 dollars per ton.

OK, here we go.....

Lets solve this problem for one days production first.

We know from Q #2 that we are producing 793.368 tons
of dry algae per day from a CO2 source of 25,000 scfm.

We assume that this dry algae is 50% oil and 50% meal.

793.368 tons per day of dry algae
./. 50% 50/50 oil and meal
= 396.684 tons of oil and tons of meal per day

Lets work with the meal first.

396.684 tons of meal per day
X $300 $300.00 per ton = ~what SBOM is worth
119,005.20 Dollars per day for algae meal

Now lets work the returns for the algae oil.

396.684 tons of oil per day
X 2,000 lbs. per ton
= 793,368 lbs. oil per day

793,368 lbs. oil per day
./. 7.5 lbs. per gallon of oil
105,782 gals of oil per day

105,782 gals of oil per day
./. 42 gals of oil per barrel
=2,518.6 barrels of oil per day
X $80 $per barrel
=$201,488 Dollars per day from algae oil
119,005.20 Dollars from algae meal per day
=$320,493.20 Total gross dollars per day

WHAT IS RETURN PER MINUTE?

320,493.20 returns per day for oil and meal
./. 1,440 # of minutes in a day
= $222.56 Dollars per minute

WHAT IS THE DOLLARS PER YEAR??

$320,493.20 returns per day for oil and meal
X 365 Days per year
=$116,980,018.00 GROSS Return per year 25,000 scfm

NOW THERE IS A WORTH WHILE GOAL!

HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND

A man and his dog.

Alan Schaefer and "Annie"


Share
Sun August 22 2010 03:58:42 PM by SAMDevelopment 8 algae  |  algae math  |  Alan Schaefer

Thanks for the kind words

Shankar,
I have been working 16 hours per day for the last????? long time. Not bad for an old guy of 72. I LOVE it!! But as my mother (she is 102) would say, "your a meer child". I have about a week of hard work ahead of me and then I can slack off to a more 'normal' pace. I look forward to geting back on oilgae............. Yesterday I finished filling the #1 PBR, well it's full plus about 50 gallons on the ground, didn't turn the hose off in time. This is just a leak test, it looks very good, just a few very small "weeps" and one weld burn-through that I plugged with a couple toothpicks, am I an engineer or what?? ( probably an OR WHAT?) ;) I will let the water in at the maximum it will hold and see if everything stays basically water tight. then I will draw down to the 'working level' and start circulation tests. Then the water will be pumped into PBR#2 and do the same thing. The real fun part is about to start!!! I can't wait. Again thanks for your kind words. Alan Schaefer aka SAMDevelopment......when I really get some time and the right mood I will tell you about SAM. ..... Cheers and have a great day.......
Alan Schaefer aka SAMDevelopment.....8-14-10
Sat August 14 2010 10:53:13 AM by SAMDevelopment 2

WHO's WHO in LED research???

We are looking to support the most promising NEW research
in the field of bio-reactor lighting with LEDs.
If you are interested or know someone who may be interested in this project please contact us at;

alan@schaeferbioengineering.com

Thank You for your time and help.

Alan Schaefer
Wed June 02 2010 10:44:06 PM by SAMDevelopment 10

Math for tank size for producing 1,000 liters of oil

◦Hasseli, finaly taking time to answer your question: "How big a reactor does it take to grow 1,000 liters of algae oil per day?" Good question! I don't know! But let's try to figure the answer out together. First we have to make some assumptions that, as they say 'may contain some forward looking statements.' We are trying to hit research targets somewhere in the future. As far as I know now some of the production assumptions I make are not being achievied NOW in the real world. But believe me, they are being worked on and every day that goes by is one day closer to our target.

So to the problem, "What is the size of a reactor that produces 1,000 liters of algae oil per 24 hours."

Assumption #1: The reactor will produce 30 grams (dry
basis) per liter capicity per day. Or 113.4 grams/gallon

Assumption # 2: The dry algae contains 50% oil and 50% meal.

Frist, I want to change liters of oil per day to gallons per day.

1,000 liters/day divided by 3.78 liters per gallon equal
264.5 gallons of algae oil per day.

Next, how many pounds of oil per day?

264.5 gal/d X 7.5 lb/gal = 1,983.75 lb/d of algae oil

Next find out the total pounds of algae produced per day

1,983.75 lb/d of oil X 2 (algae is 50% oil & 50% meal) =

3,967.5 lb/d of dry algae X 454 grams per lb.=

1,801,245 grams per day of dry algae divided by 113.4
grams of algae per gallon per day = 15,884 gallons/reactor to make 1,000 liters of algae oil.

15,884 gallons X 3.78liters per gallon = 60,041 liters
Close enough?

Sorry for mixing English and Metric systems, I,m trying to get there in my head but still not all the parts fit.
I'm 72 ......they probably never will. ;)
Have a good day!
Alan Schaefer
Wed May 26 2010 09:07:41 AM by SAMDevelopment 15

ANSWER TO QUESTION #3 OF "MONDAY MATH." POST

Question #3 What is the GROSS returns in dollars for the production of two algae products....oil and protien meal. We asume that the algae production will be equally
divided; 50% oil and 50% meal. Here are some additional
assumptions: oil sells for $80.00 per barrel, algae meal sells for $300.00 dollars per ton.

OK, here we go.....

Lets solve this problem for one days production first.

We know from Q #2 that we are producing 793.368 tons
of dry algae per day from a CO2 source of 25,000 scfm.

We assume that this dry algae is 50% oil and 50% meal.

793.368 tons per day of dry algae
./. 50% 50/50 oil and meal
= 396.684 tons of oil and tons of meal per day

Lets work with the meal first.

396.684 tons of meal per day
X $300 $300.00 per ton = ~what SBOM is worth
119,005.20 Dollars per day for algae meal

Now lets work the returns for the algae oil.

396.684 tons of oil per day
X 2,000 lbs. per ton
= 793,368 lbs. oil per day

793,368 lbs. oil per day
./. 7.5 lbs. per gallon of oil
105,782 gals of oil per day

105,782 gals of oil per day
./. 42 gals of oil per barrel
=2,518.6 barrels of oil per day
X $80 $ per barrel
=$201,488 Dollars per day from algae oil
119,005.20 Dollars from algae meal per day
=$320,493.20 Total gross dollars per day

WHAT IS RETURN PER MINUTE?

320,493.20 returns per day for oil and meal
./. 1,440 # of minutes in a day
= $222.56 Dollars per minute

WHAT IS THE DOLLARS PER YEAR??

$320,493.20 returns per day for oil and meal
X 365 Days per year
=$116,980,018.00 GROSS Return per year for a 25,000 scfm

NOW THERE IS A WORTH WHILE GOAL!

HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND

A man and his dog.

Alan Schaefer and "Annie"
Sat May 22 2010 09:51:27 AM by SAMDevelopment 5

Answer to Question #2 Sat. May 22

Question #2 What is the production of dry algae in:

LBS. PER MINUTE?

3,085.5 Lbs./minute of CO2 (from line 3, question #1)
./. 2.8 lbs. CO2 per 1 lb algae produced(./. means divide)
=1,101.9 lbs. of dry algae/ minute

TONS PER MINUTE?

1,101.9 lbs, dry algae per minute
./. 2,000 2.000 lbs. = 1 ton
= .55095 tons per minute of dry algae

TONS PER DAY?

.55095 tons per minute
X 1,440 minutes per day
= 793.368 tons per day

TONS PER YEAR?

793.368 tons per day
X 365 days per year
=289,579 tons per year of dry algae
Sat May 22 2010 08:29:27 AM by SAMDevelopment