Oilgae Club - an Online Community for Algae Fuel Enthusiasts Worldwide.

Blogs under tag Joule Unlimited

Joule gets a patent on gene modified cyanobacterium Posted by Richard on Tue September 14 2010 12:10:29 PM 5

I have always held the company, Joule Unlimited at a high level in my mind, but  never new what they were upto.

They are in the RedHerrings 100 top disruptive companies and now that I read about their patent, I know why they are so highly rated.

Strictly speaking Cyanobacterium is not an algae.
Cyanobacterium is called blue-green algae.

Joule has won a patent for a genetically altered Cyano bacterium.

The bacterium's product, which it secretes like sweat, is a class of
hydrocarbon molecules called alkanes that are chemically
indistinguishable from the ones made in oil
refineries. The organism can grow in bodies of water unfit for drinking
or on land that is useless for farming.
This is as per  the company, Joule
Unlimited of Cambridge, Mass.


The bacterium's product, which it secretes like sweat, is a class of
hydrocarbon molecules called alkanes that are chemically
indistinguishable from the ones made in oil
refineries.


The organism can grow in bodies of water unfit for drinking
or on land that is useless for farming, according to the company, Joule
Unlimited of Cambridge, Mass.



An independent expert, Matthew C. Posewitz, a professor at the Colorado
School of Mines, said that making an organism that secreted hydrocarbons
was ?definitely one of the most active areas in the whole game right
now.?


He said that Joule did not yet have a proved process, but that it had
strong research and development capabilities. "They have some extreme
horsepower within that company," the Prof said.



Richard Spyros

Building Microbial Fuel Factories Posted by Richard on Fri September 03 2010 11:26:12 PM 1

Joule Unlimited, a startup based in Cambridge, MA, is genetically altering photosynthetic micro organisms so that over their lifetime, they devote only 5 percent of the solar energy they absorb to growing and staying alive. 

The rest goes to secreting a steady supply of diesel fuel.
 The company, which is building a pilot plant in Leander, TX, says its process will generate 15 to 25 times as much fuel per acre as technology for making fuels from cellulosic biomass, but that it will take several years to demonstrate at a large scale.

 Synthetic Genomics, with funding from ExxonMobil that could exceed $300 million, is taking a similar approach, working with algae.


Richard Spyros